We're Open For Business As Usual!

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As some of you may well know, we’re expecting our first baby in the coming days/ weeks.  After 9 months of growing this little one in my tummy, we are finally going to get to meet her for the very first time and we’re both super excited!  

We haven’t pencilled in any markets over the next couple of months until we get to grips with the demands of our new arrival, but we are hoping that by September we will be able to attend the Local Makers Market in Wanstead on Sat 7th, and Netil Market in London Fields with dates currently tbc.

The online shop is open for business as usual so if you need to pick up pressies for your loved ones or just treats for yourself then feel free to order online.  We have stock of most items (which we prepared knowing the next few months would be a bit crazy!) so it’s likely that we will be able to send out pieces relatively quickly to you.

We want to thank all of our customers and readers for their support over the last few months… we’ve had a brilliant start to the year, learnt so much already, met some amazing people along the way, and we hope the business continues to grow in this sustainable and organic way.

If you need any help with placing an order online or would like something custom made, then feel free to email us on studiomalihey@gmail.com and we will get back to you as soon as we can.

Thank you and we look forward to introducing our new arrival!

 
Looking bumpy at almost 9 months pregnant…..

Looking bumpy at almost 9 months pregnant…..

 

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Product: New Designs Of The Luders Placemats

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This week we’re thrilled to reveal 2 new designs of the Luders Placemats, making there 8 unique designs for you to choose from.

 
Our latest designs

Our latest designs

 
 
Our latest designs

Our latest designs

 

These statement placemats are inspired by shapes in contemporary architecture in Berlin, namely the Marie-Elisabeth Luders House which is set against the fluid Spree river.

 
The Marie-Elisabeth Luders House in Berlin

The Marie-Elisabeth Luders House in Berlin

 

The abstract shapes and sketchy outlines will give your home a contemporary yet arty feel, perfect for those with an eye for modernist design. It’s abstract art for your dining table!

 
The placemats paired with the Luders Coasters

The placemats paired with the Luders Coasters

 

They reference the great mid-century abstract expressionist painters such as Ben Nicholson and Victor Passmore in their style and retro colour palettes.

 
The work of Victor Passmore,  image curticy of Printed Editions

The work of Victor Passmore, image curticy of Printed Editions

 

Each placemat is handmade in Hackney (London) and all of our plywood is FSC approved making it sustainably sourced.

They are easy to wipe clean and are heat, stain and dirt resistant.

 
The full set of 8 Luders Placemats

The full set of 8 Luders Placemats

 

See how they are made…

 
 

You can order them from our online shop in sets of 4, 6 and 8. Or if you would like to mix up the designs for a custom set then send us an email to studiomalihey@gmail.com and we will get back to you shortly.

We also make coasters to match…..

 

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Product - 2 New Designs Of The Luders Placemats, by Studio Mali
 

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Commissions: A Bespoke Backgammon Game With A Contemporary Spin

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Entering a new realm of product this month…. board games. Mark and I have chatted before about making kids toys from plywood such as puzzles and cut out shapes, but until now games for adults hadn’t really been on the cards (excuse the pun!).

Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.

It all started when we met a friendly chap called Chris at Netil Market in London Fields back in April. He spotted our products and was keen to see if we could make his vision of a contemporary backgammon set a reality. With a background in architecture and surveying, Chris sent over some detailed 3D sketches of the board game complete with measurements so we had something solid to work from.

Chris’s sketch

Chris’s sketch

We chatted the design through and made some minor adjustments to the spec based on the thickness of the plywood, then used CAD to sketch up the final drawing ready for laser cutting. Chris selected the colours from some swatches of painted plywood, and we love his final selection of the grey contrasted with the luders green!

Colour options for Chris to choose from

Colour options for Chris to choose from

A CAD of the disc counters

A CAD of the disc counters

The next part was the fun bit, making it. Mark laser cut all of the pieces from plywood and together we sanded off the burnt edges and glued them in several stages for the construction.

Once the frame was constructed, more sanding has to be done to ensure the box was beautifully smooth and that all of the edges alined. I hand-sprayed the colour onto the marquetry pieces using an airbrush and watered down paint, and once dry I applied a layer of varnish before inserting and gluing to the board.

Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.

The round discs ended up taking about a day to make, mostly because there were so many of them and each had to undergo a number of processes from hand-sanding to spraying on colour, and gluing to varnishing. They were really satisfying to make though and look really neat!

Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.

Once the box was fully constructed and all of the marquetry inserted, the next step was to varnish the entire thing, twice. A light sand was done in-between each layer to make sure it has that super smooth finish.

Et voila! Our first ever board game commissioned by Chris.

A big thank you to Chris for giving us the opportunity to make something as unique as this for him. We hope he gets many hours of enjoyment out of playing this game… what a special piece to own.

Here it is in it’s full glory….

Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.
Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.
Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.
Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.
Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.
Bespoke Backgammon Game by Studio Mali.  Made In London.
We were attracted to the Studio Mali stall at Netil Market on a sunny Saturday morning a couple of weeks ago by their simple yet beautifully designed place mats and coasters. We had a chat with delightful Mark who explained a bit about Studio Mali and how they make their designs. We also asked about Commissions. We went home and pondered and discussed and got in touch with Mark by email and that was the birth of a bespoke Backgammon set. We collected the Backgammon set and the placemats and coasters from Mark and Ali a couple of weeks later and they are even more beautiful than we could have hoped for. It is such a joy to have things in your home which are beautiful and useful and made with such love and passion. Thank you Mark and Ali so much for making and designing these oh so special pieces for us. We feel some more Commissions coming on!
— Chris and Julie Ttoffali

If there’s something that you would like us to work on, a bespoke piece that you can’t find elsewhere, then why not get in contact. Whether it’s a piece of furniture, an item of jewellery or something special for your home, we may be able to make your dream a reality. Just send us an email on studiomalihey@gmail.com with some information about your project and we will get back to you shortly.

You can also check out our commissions page to see what else we’ve been working on….


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Commissions - A Bespoke Backgammon Game With A Contemporary Spin
 

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Hungary: Top Things To Do In Budapest On A Budget

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Ah Budapest! How beautiful you are. I mean talk about epic architecture, scenic rivers and hilly surroundings… this city seems to have a bit of everything.

From the grand Parliament building set on the tranquil Danube River to the historic Castle Hill, there are plenty of places to explore and top-quality sights to see for the city-loving traveller. The ruin bars of the Jewish Quarter transport you to the shabby-chic akin to Berlin’s alt warehouses, and for those that love to party, these bars are open till the early hours every single day. For those of you in need of something a little more relaxing, treat yourself to one of the many thermal spas dotted around the city, or take a trip to Margaret Island to practice mindfulness in nature. There is so much history to be learnt, from the Fascist invasion in World War II, followed by strict communist ruling for the next 40 years, the wounds of Hungary’s past can be felt throughout the city and spotted in the ornate crumbling buildings.

 
Beautiful architecture on the Pest side of the city

Beautiful architecture on the Pest side of the city

 

We loved Budapest, it has definitely made it onto the top of our favourite European cities list. If you are looking for a cheap place to spend a few days, breath-taking architecture and plenty of sights to keep you busy then Budapest sounds like the place for you.

Take a look at our suggested ‘Top Things To Do In Budapest On A Budget’…..


Get Hungry At The Great Market Hall

This epic hall houses the largest indoor market in Budapest and its expansive neo-Gothic architecture makes for an impressive experience.  The metal framed roof structure is a clear draw, giving the space a light and airy feel whilst imposing its Gothic form over the hall.  Split over 3 floors, you'll find a range of cooked foods such as lángos and goulash, Hungarian souvenirs and fresh groceries including fruit and veg, baked breads and pastries, local cheeses and cured meats... yum!  The cherry strudel is worth a try, as is the pogácsa (Hungarian scone).... we really are suckers for baked goods!  A good time to head there would be for lunch when you can pick up a selection of fresh foods and take them to the Danube for a munch.  Yes it is touristy, but there are also a lot of locals picking up their groceries too.

The market is open Monday to Saturday 6am-6pm but closes early on Mondays at 5pm and 3pm on Saturdays. Address is Budapest, Vámház krt. 1-3, 1093.

www.budapestmarkethall.com

 
The neo-Gothic Great Market Hall

The neo-Gothic Great Market Hall

 

Escape The City On Margaret Island

If you’re looking for green space and an escape from the erratic Hungarian driving then Margaret Island is the place for you.  Positioned in the middle of the Danube river, the island is a hub for sports, leisure activities and leafy spaces, offering tourists and locals a place to connect with fitness and nature.  There is a 5.5km running track which spans the island (make sure you run in the correct direction!), walking routes, cycle routes and plenty of places to hire bikes, tandems and pedalos.  The island also features its own medieval ruins, a lido and national swimming pool, a Japanese garden and some famous musical fountains (although these were being renovated when we visited).  In the summer, the open-air concert venue puts on shows to the public and the green spaces are filled with beer-drinking sun worshipers.  This is one of the most popular parks in Budapest and we would definitely recommend a visit.

The island can be accessed halfway along Margaret Bridge and is open day and night all year round.  Trams 4 and 6 stop just outside on the bridge and bus no. 26 from Nyugati station takes you all the way in. Otherwise it’s a 45 minute walk from the Jewish Quarter.

 
Wintery but still pretty, one of the greens on Margaret Island

Wintery but still pretty, one of the greens on Margaret Island

 


Learn About Hungary’s Tortured Past

A visit to the House of Terror is a must when coming to Budapest as it highlights the atrocities of both the Fascist and Communist rulings of Hungary during the 20th century.  The museum tells a sad story of Budapest, from the Nazi take over towards the end of the Second World War, the result was the mass genocide of thousands of Hungarian (and European) Jews. Those horrors were quickly followed by Soviet communist rule for the next 40 years. The country was brought to it’s knees and an unimaginable number of people lost their lives in horrendous ways at the hands of both regimes.  The museum is set in the former headquarters of the Fascist Arrow Cross party and later State Security services, where it was used as a prison and place of torture for those who were thought to have gone against the government.  Some of the prison area still remains in the basement and forms part of the exhibition, it’s very 1984! Scarily it is not known how far these cells went underground because the tunnels had been filled in with concrete by the time the Soviets had left.  The information is well written and engaging, but most of the memorabilia is not described or translated into English.

Entry is 3000 huf (£8.12) per person and the museum is open 10am-6pm daily, closing on Mondays.

www.terrorhaza.hu

 
The House Of Terror Museum

The House Of Terror Museum

 



Ride The Number 2 Tram

This was recommended to us by a Budapest local who goes out of her way to take this tram every day to work.  Running along the east side of the Danube river, the tram ride is ridiculously scenic, with views of Buda Castle, Liberty Statue on Gellert Hill and the Fisherman’s Bastion on the Buda side of the city.  The tram takes a winding route around Parliament building with spectacular views from 3 sides.  The tram itself is pretty retro, with pairs of window seats facing each other in a rickety-style carriage.  We really enjoyed this trip and for 350huf (95p) a go, it is definitely worth it!

You can catch the number 2 tram northbound from the architecturally award-winning Fovam ter station, all the way up to the entrance of Margaret Island on Margaret Bridge.  We would recommend sitting on the left-hand side for optimum views over the river and Parliament building.

Make sure you punch your ticket in the machine on the tram as they are hot on fines if you get caught!

 
The view from the number 2 tram window of the Parliament building

The view from the number 2 tram window of the Parliament building

 

Marvel At The Parliament Building

Rarely do I go to a city and think that the architecture is more impressive than Londons, but Budapest is definitely one of those cities that would give it a run for its money.  The Hungarian Parliamentary Building is a prime example of this, it’s grand scale makes it the one of the largest buildings in Hungary and it’s Gothic Revival-style architecture gives it an incredibly dramatic form from all angles.  This ginormous building has 20 kilometres of stairs and 691 rooms (I mean what could you possibly need 691 rooms for?!) and is the home of legislature, a workplace for members of parliament and their assistants, and guards the safe keeping of the Hungarian Holy Crown.  It is possible to tour this building costing around 3500huf (£9.47), but we were happy just looking from the outside.  For the optimum view of the Parliament building, head over to the Buda side of the river on the promenade for a full frontal view (cheeky!).

www.parlament.hu

 
The epic Parliament building, as seen from the Buda side of the city

The epic Parliament building, as seen from the Buda side of the city

 


Be Wowed By Szimpla Kert Ruin Bar

Touristy I know, but 100% worth a visit (or maybe even two), this ruin bar is an impressive conversion of a disused factory and now is a cultural centre for music, film, food and nightlife.  The space itself is an awe-inspiring shabby chic mishmash of quirky objects, graffiti, plants and lighting, making it look more like a post-apocolyptic filmset rather than a pub.  You can’t help but be amazed on first entry, the sheer scale and work that’s gone into the decor is pretty overwhelming.  The building contains many sub-rooms and hangout areas throughout, sprawling across 2 floors and an outdoor area, so you can always find a spot to suit your mood.  

Since opening in 2002, Szimpla Kert has had a green and eco outlook; by promoting sustainable urban living, by giving up-and-coming musicians a platform to perform from, and by serving locally grown food produce to its customers.  Every Sunday the venue hosts a farmers market, where locals can pick up good quality sustainable produce at affordable prices.  It also gives the opportunity for the consumer to re-connect with the farmers which is a huge issue that needs to be addressed in our food industry today.  

Overall, this is a lovely place to come down for a coffee or beer on an afternoon, or for a few drinks in the evening with friends.  If you’re lucky enough to be around on a Sunday then the market runs from 9am-2pm, and if you can afford a bottomless brunch for 5000huf (£13.50) then you will be reassured in the knowledge that you are eating some top quality produce and supporting a sustainable food industry.

Open daily 12pm-4am, and 9am-4am on Sundays.

www.szimpla.hu

 
Szimpla Kert by night, palm plants and colourful lighting

Szimpla Kert by night, palm plants and colourful lighting

 


Take A Stroll Up To The Historic Castle Hill

The Castle District on the Buda side of the city is home to a number of key attractions including the ornate Matthias Church, the Disney-like Fisherman’s Bastion, the popular funicular and Buda Castle itself.  This medieval UNESCO World Heritage site offers spanning views over the Danube river and city, and makes for a lovely morning or afternoons exploration along the cobbled streets of the Old Town and leafy hillsides.  The neo-gothic style Fisherman’s Bastion was actually built in the early 20th century specially as a viewing platform and sits next to the colourfully tiled gothic Matthias Church.  You can walk along the old castle walls of Buda Castle for great views out over the city and explore inside the courtyards for free, and for the contemporary architecture-lovers out there, you’ll enjoy the oxidised steel staircases that lead you up to the old castle walls.

The funicular, which takes you from Chain Bridge up to the top of Castle Hill, is the second oldest of its kind in the world and was built 150 years ago.  Amazingly, it functions on a system of weights and counterweights, maintaining its traditional engineering systems.  If you want a quick and novel way of getting up the hill then this is for you but to be honest we were happy with the stroll.

We visited in February and it wasn’t too busy, but this is apparently the most popular tourist attraction in all of Budapest so expect it to be bustling in peak season.  Apparently a good time to visit is just before sunset when most tourists have headed back to the Pest side for the day.

Castle Hill is open all hours of to explore, but if you want to go into specific buildings then standard opening hours will apply.  It’s free to walk around outside so is great for the budget traveller, but you have to pay for entry to any of the attractions.

 
The colourful tiled roof of St Matthias Church on Castle Hill

The colourful tiled roof of St Matthias Church on Castle Hill

 

Enjoy The View At The Citadel

The walk up to the Citadel is a pleasant meander around the leafy hillsides, with many routes and paths leading up to the top.  As you ascend the path, views over the Danube and Pest side of the city unfold before you, until you reach the top of Gellért Hill with its beautiful panoramic views over the city below.  The citadel itself is a 19th century fortress made from stone, still with bullet holes displaying the tragedies of Hungary’s troubled past. Gellért Hill is a nice spot to bring a picnic, with grassy places to sit down and plenty of benches to perch on.  There isn’t loads to do at the Citadel other than to enjoy the view, but this is one of the free things to do in Budapest so it’s worth a trip.

You can get to the Citadel walking paths by crossing either Elisabeth Bridge or Szabadsag Bridge and then walking up.

 
Me and my bump at the top of the Citadel viewing platform

Me and my bump at the top of the Citadel viewing platform

 

Get Inspired At The Ludwig Museum Of Contemporary Art

A walk down the promenade from the Great Market Hall to the Ludwig Museum of Contemporary Art is a must as it’s one of the only car-free sections next to the Danube River.  The gallery itself is the only public collection in the country that houses art from both local and international artists, and therefore is crucial to the contemporary art scene.  The museum was founded by Peter and Irene Ludwig, avid collectors of contemporary art, who owned a whopping collection of 12,000 pieces!  They needed somewhere to store their collection right?! And since 2005 the Ludwig Museum has been located in the architecturally impressive building, Palace of Arts.  Although the collection on display wasn’t my favourite, it still made an enjoyable mornings activity and I would say that the building itself is worth a visit (if you like modern architecture that is).  The museum has a perminant collection of artworks and a temporary exhibition space which changes 8-10 times a year.

Entry is 2,400huf (£6.50) for both the permanent and temporary exhibitions and the gallery is open Tues-Sun 10am-8pm.

www.ludwigmuseum.hu

 
Contemporary architecture at The Ludwig Museum Of Contemporary Art

Contemporary architecture at The Ludwig Museum Of Contemporary Art

 

Soak Up The Vibe At The Jewish Quarter

If you are looking for trendy eateries, cool bars and somewhere to let-lose then the Jewish Quarter is the place for you.  Ruin bars such as Szimpla Kert, Instant and Fogas Ház offer clubbers a place to party until the early hours (any day of the week) in a fun and care-free environment.  The Jewish Quarter is the hub of eating out with a huge array of international cuisines being served from Thai to American-style burgers, and Vietnamese to European dishes.  You can pretty much find any food you want here including very cheap donner kebabs served from a man in a booth!  There are plenty of lovely coffee shops to relax in, independent boutiques such as the inspiring concept store Printa, and small art galleries like The Kahan Art Space to explore.  We spent a lot of our time here, wondering the beautiful streets and stopping off for the odd coffee/beer to relax our legs.  The Jewish Quarter is a great place to base yourself for your trip to Budapest.

 
Inside concept store Printa with its plywood fittings

Inside concept store Printa with its plywood fittings

 

Food

Reading of all the Hungarian foods we wanted to try before our trip, we were super excited at the thought of Lángos (a fried bread smothered in cream cheese), goulash (a beef soupy-stew with spices), Kürtös Kalács (chimney cake which is a tube of sweet bread rolled in sugar) and all the various cheeses, cured meats meat soups and cakes, we were really sad to say that we were disappointed all round and didn’t find any of what we tried that tasty.  We mostly went to étkezdes which are Hungarian home-cooked food style cheap eateries, but each time we found the food a bit underwhelming in flavour and there just wasn’t very much of it! The Lángos was probably the biggest let down, I mean surely you can’t go wrong with bread and cheese right?  But apparently you can and the whole thing was just oily and flavourless despite going to one of the most popular stalls in town, Retró Lángos Büfé.  The best thing we probably ate was a Hungarian desert of walnut dumplings with vanilla sauce (which was a bit like an English bread pudding with custard) but other than that we didn’t feel like there was much to shout about.  Sorry Hungary, did we miss something?!  

 
Believe it or not, this was the best thing we ate!

Believe it or not, this was the best thing we ate!

 

On our last day we spotted a budget cafe in a food hall called Mangalica Heaven which was actually much cheaper than the other étkezdes we had visited, such as Kádár Étkezde and Frici Papa.  You can get 2 courses for around 1200huf (£3.25) and the place was really busy at lunchtime which was a good sign.  For those of you travelling on a budget, be aware that most of the étkezdes are only open in the weekdays for lunch and then are closed in the evenings and weekends.  Perhaps you just need to spend a bit more to get tastier Hungarian food?  I really hope you have better luck with the food than we did!

 
Lángos, it looks the part but just tastes like grease!

Lángos, it looks the part but just tastes like grease!

 

Where We Didn’t Get To….

Our trip was cut a bit short due to Mark getting the flu for 3 days and so there were a couple of activities that we wanted to do but didn’t get round to.  Although they are a bit on the expensive side, we would have liked to have gone to one of the famous spas such as the Gellért or Széchenyi Baths, both known for their thermal waters and healing qualities.  There is Memento Park, a sculpture park on the outskirts of the city displaying all the communist monuments and sculptures that once stood in Budapest during the soviet regime.  If we had visited outside of the winter months when the leaves were on the trees then we would have taken a trip out to the Buda Hills, an expanse of green space in the city where you can find trekking routes and perfect spots for a picnic.  The Hungarian National Museum was being renovated when we visited, but it would have been interesting to see some national artefacts and learn a bit more about the countries history.   If you can spare 16 Euro a ticket (ouch!), then the Dohány Street Synagogue looked like it would have been worth a visit as it’s the largest synagogue in the world outside of Israel.  Other than that, I think we covered most of the main attractions that we were interested in, and mostly it was just interesting to walk around and explore the city.

 
The Dohany Street Synagogue

The Dohany Street Synagogue

 

We hope our article 'Top Things To Do In Budapest On A Budget’ was helpful for you, feel free to leave any comments in the box below (especially if you have any more suggestions about the food!).

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Video: Lake District

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Some time ago we spent 5 days walking and wild camping in the Lake District and totally forgot that we’d filmed the whole thing! Alas, we introduce a rather belated video from a trip last summer. We hope this video will give you an insight into the ever changing weather, sheer beauty and the day-to-day walking lifestyle of the Lakes. Not to mentioned the huge cream teas that we devoured in every village!

If you’ve never wild camped before it’s a truly liberating way of getting face to face with the great outdoors, but with most of life’s little luxuries stripped away. It teaches you to really consider your needs against your wants, how to improvise and makes each day an adventure. Some days we walked for 10 hours while others were more like 4 but after some dinner cooked up on a stove and good nights sleep next to a lake you’re always ready for a big hike the next day.

Anyhow, here’s the video:

We wrote a whole article about wild camping in the Lake District, which is the perfect companion piece for planning and budgeting for a loop around the lakes. Here it is:

 
 

Video: How We Make The Luders Placemats

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Happy New Year to you all!

We used the festive holiday to rest (eat and drink too much), reflect and ponder on what might be next to our Studio Mali adventure. We’ve set ourselves a few targets for the start of the year. Although selling at markets over Christmas was an amazing experience, oh my it was tiring! We didn't have a second to think about what 2019 might hold. So we made some decisions, firstly taking a few months off the markets to develop some new products, spend some time sprucing up the market stall aesthetics and a sneaky little winter get-away to Hungary. We also wanted to start sharing how we make our products to help our readers understand what goes into each product. So here we are…

Let us introduce an in-the-making video of our most recent product the Luders Placemats, inspired by architecture of the Marie-Elisabeth Luders Haus on the bank of the river Spree, Berlin. We were a bit camera shy to do a full voiceover but we’ve recorded all the processes that are needed to get it ready for the kitchen table! Of course, for the sake of story telling and repetition we have skipped some of the repeated sanding stages, we didn’t want to bore you!

Here’s the finished article, click the image for safe passage to the shop…

Here’s the finished article, click the image for safe passage to the shop…

Step-by-step

  1. The making starts by sending the CAD design to our CAM machine, in this case a laser cutter. We place in a piece of sustainably sourced birch-faced aeroply that has been cut down from a larger sheet. We are careful to pick pieces with the most interesting grain and with the fewest blemishes. We also check that the grain is vertical.

  2. After laser cutting, we number and masking tape the individual pieces so we can fit them back together later, systems are quite important when you make 20 of the same thing that are essentially large puzzles!

  3. We finish the wood with three different grades of sandpaper. First a rough p120, a finer p400 and very fine p600 which leaves the plywood really smooth to touch.

  4. We use an airgun to apply the different colours, making 2/3 passes per colour, cleaning out the gun with water between passes and colour changes. This part is quite time consuming as we always run into problems getting the acrylic paint to the correct consistency.

  5. Then, we apply a strong resin-based adhesive to the 0.8mm aeroply layer which are then fixed to a 4mm plywood base that we prepared earlier, preparation is everything they say!

  6. We are careful to clamp everything in the right place (that’s a Radiohead song right?) whilst the adhesive sets. Note: if we get this bit wrong the whole piece is ruined and we will have to start again.

  7. Then the fun part, sanding the burnt edges on the electric sander and cleaning up the rounded corners. After the rough finish on the sand belt, we follow the same process as before hand sanding the backs and edges with a rough grit p60 on the logo and then p120, p400 and finally p600 which leaves the ply incredibly smooth.

  8. We hoover or brush off the extra dust particles and prepare the wood for varnishing.

  9. To get the best finish we use a spray polyurethane varnish that is applied in even layers. The finish is key, as it offers a long-lasting protection to just about everything the kitchen can throw at it. It’s not as environmentally friendly as other finishes but it should last a lifetime if looked after, which counter balances its damaging polymer credentials.

  10. We finish with a last light sand with the p600 sand paper and then its finished, voila!

Here’s the video:

We hope you enjoyed our making video! If there’s anything else you’d like to know about the product or processes involved we would love to hear from you. Just pop your comment in the box below and we will get back to you.

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