sunset

Jordan: A Bedouin Camp In The Wadi Rum Desert

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As I'm sure you well know, we are avid fans of travelling on a budget.  With only £25 between us per day, we usually opt for the cheapest accommodation possible, eat with the locals, and pick and choose our activities carefully.  We started doing this out of necessity, we had saved up enough money for 10 months and needed to stick to the budget carefully or risk going home early!  But after a few months of doing this, we decided that it was our preferred way to travel.  You meet so many more people when you are trying to save money, whether that be through hitchhiking or eating in cafes with the local folk.

 

But when our friends Dom and Elly came to join us in Jordan on a 4 day holiday, it seemed like a great excuse to take a holiday ourselves away from the paired-back travel life we had grown so accustom to.  We booked a cool-looking Bedouin camp in the Wadi Rum desert on Elly's suggestion, and crossed our fingers that it was going to be worth the splash out.  For 25JD (£26) per night, this is what a Bedouin camp in the Wadi Rum desert looks like......

 

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The journey in......

Our host picks us up from the visitor centre in an open-air truck and we bump along the sandy desert floor, marvelling at our first glimpse of Wadi Rum.  There are a few other 4X4's speeding around, trying to find the best spot for sundown.

 

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The camp

We arrive at our camp just before sundown, the shadows are long and the sands are a stunning shade of orange in the low lighting.  We had booked the cheapest double possible with a shared bathroom, but on arrival we were told that we had been upgraded for free into one of their luxury tents with a panoramic desert view.  It really was our lucky day!

 

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Geometric dreams

No curtains.... just this view for the next 14 hours.  We feel as though we've hit the jackpot.  I don't know about you but I've never stayed anywhere quite as epic as this.  The oversized window makes you feel as though there is nothing between you and nature, that the desert sand almost continues onto your bedroom floor.  

 

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A sunset to remember

Before feasting on a Bedouin dinner, we climb up onto the rocks nearby and silently watch the sun go down.  What's better than nature, the sunsetting, and our friends to share it all with.

 

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Morning meditation

The sun comes up and we are keen to make the most of our time in this incredible place.  We head out for a walk to the mountains ahead, and on our return spend the next 15 minutes meditating in front of this stunning view.  No one's around, it's just us and the landscape.

 

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Bedouin hang out

The central focus in the camp is the fire, and everything else works around it.  There is always 3 pots of tea brewing on the flame; lightly sweetened mint tea, sweetened mint tea, and crazily sweetened mint tea.  I opt for the least sweet option, thinking that it's going to be bearable, but it's so disgustingly sweet that my teeth are furry after only a few sips.... I think I'll pass and avoid any future decay!

 

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The happy traveller

Mark's enjoying the comfort of the open-air camp after 9 months worth of slumming it! Goodbye damp dingy rooms, and welcome tribal fun camp.

 

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Quiet time

On the other side of the camp behind a huge rock, is more seating for those looking for a quiet spot to read in.  In the afternoon this will be flooded with sunshine.

 

 
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ethnic textiles

The Bedouin people make up over a third of the population of Jordan, and are known as animal breeders and herders.  Some even adopt a nomadic way of life, moving at various times of the year for the benefit of their livestock.  It is common to see ethnic textiles like this in hotels and camps around Jordan, and these days it is mostly mass-produced.  Traditionally women would have hand-woven textiles in designs similar to this, and they would have been used to make shelter for their families.  Bedouin camps used to be called 'Beit Al-Sha’ar' which means 'house of hair', for the fact that it was all woven from goats hair.  

 

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Eggs and zataar

For those of you that don't know, zataar is a delicious spice mix popular in Jordan and the middle east.  The locals love to eat it on everything, and after visiting Jordan we shared the same love for it.  For our breakfast we got to eat it with eggs, flatbreads and cheese, lucky us!

 

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A quick tour

We book in for a quick tour of the surrounding area, and try to squeeze in as much as possible before getting back to Amman.  2 hours in the 4X4 sets us back 35JD (£35) between the 4 of us and we get taken to some sand dunes, a viewpoint, to see some ancient rock inscriptions and a carving of Lawrence Of Arabia.  It isn't the best tour we've ever been on, but it's pretty fun riding round the desert at high speeds.  

 

What we say....

A trip to the Wadi Rum desert definitely isn't the cheapest thing to do in Jordan, but actually we think it's worth the splash out for spending at least a night there.  The scenery is just unworldly, the camps are very relaxing, and it's one of those experiences that will stick in your mind for a long time afterwards.  This is where they filmed the 60s classic blockbuster 'Lawrence Of Arabia' and the less classic 'The Martian'.  We were half expecting Matt Damon to pop out from behind a rock and shout..... "Matt Damon".

 

costs involved and how to get there

If you are trying to visit on a budget then just bear in mind that there are a few hidden costs involved; dinner is around 10JD (£10) per person at the camp, but you can bring your own if you want to.  A taxi back to Aqaba costs around 35JD (£35) where you can catch a local bus to Amman.  There is no direct bus to Wadi Rum from either Amman or Aqaba, but you may be able to jump out on the main road if your bus is passing.  On leaving Wadi Rum, you could potentially get to the Desert Highway and try to hitchhike to Aqaba or Amman from there.  Tours cost around 35JD (£35) for a 2 hour ride in a 4X4 and that's to see 4 tourist sights.  Breakfast is free at the camp.  

We stayed at one called 'Wadi Rum Dream Camp' but there are many more around that you can find on booking.com.  We had a free upgrade to stay in their luxury double room tent with a bathroom, and it cost us only 25JD (£26) for the night.  We heard about a couple that booked somewhere to stay online and sadly the camp didn't exist, just make sure there are plenty of reviews and ratings before you book somewhere.

If money isn't an issue for you then we would recommend staying for a few nights unless you are one of those people that gets easily bored.  There are plenty of walks to do around there for free, 4X4 tours, camel riding and just generally chilling out at the camp.  We would love to go back and spend some more time in Wadi Rum.  There is something very special about being in the desert and at the mercy of mother nature.  All in all, it's a very invigorating experience.

If you have any questions then just hit us up in the comment box below!

 

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Myanmar: The Ultimate 2 Week Travel Itinerary For Backpackers 

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It’s stunningly diverse landscapes, friendly people and traditional culture makes Myanmar the perfect place to discover. From the white sands and palm-tree lined beaches of Ngapali, to the crumbling ancient temples of Bagan, you can travel around the country for weeks on end going from beautiful sight to another. 

Sunrise in Bagan, Myanmar

MYANMAR

The typical traveller route is well trodden, a well-oiled machine if you will, but it doesn’t really seem to matter because all of the highlights are so memorable and enjoyable.  We recently backpacked through this photogenic country, starting our adventure in the capital Yangon.  From there we travelled to Ngapali beach on the west coast, to Old Bagan to see the ancient temples, next Mandalay to soak up city life, then onto to Kalaw to relax and walk in the green forests.  From there we did the famous 3 day trek over to Inle Lake, finally spending some time there exploring the beautiful lake before returning to Yangon.  We have written up ‘The Ultimate 2 Week Travel Itinerary' as a helpful guide for you to follow.  If you have more time then you can always space it out over 3 weeks, like we did. 

 

Day 1: 

Yangon 

Yangon is Myanmar’s largest city, a sprawling network of British colonial buildings, streets of shabby apartments stacked on top of one another, Buddhist pagodas, and the odd modern high rise that breaks through the skyline.  Regardless of its size, the city has maintained an incredibly local feel to it, you only need to wonder down any of the central streets of downtown to see people out selling their produce, men walking around in tradition wrap skirts (bana) and women wearing the signature sun-protective paint on their faces.  A polished city this is not, and for those looking to tick off from a big ‘to do list’ may be disappointed.  Yangon is a place to soak up atmosphere and to learn about the local way of life. You just need to take the time to wonder the streets, watch the locals and observe the culture that’s around you.  

Exploring the streets of Yangon

Exploring the streets of Yangon

So either stay a night now in Yangon and head to Ngapali beach the next day, or just get on a sleeper bus that very same day. We would recommend just heading out of the city and then exploring Yangon at the end of the trip.

If you do wish to leave that day then you will need to book an overnight sleeper coach to Ngapali beach.  There are two companies that specialise in bus tickets to Ngapali and that’s Ye Aung lan and Aung Thistar. Ye Aung Ian’s bus leaves at 4pm but you will need to be at the coach station for 3pm, and Aung Thistar leaves at 2.30pm and you will need to be there for 1.30pm.  The bus costs 15,000 kyat for a local bus from either of those companies (4 people across), and a bit more on a VIP bus with 3 people across.  Get a tuk tuk driver or cab to take you to the correct bus stop/station as it’s probably the biggest bus station we have ever seen!  The overnight sleeper takes 14-16 hours and is a winding path along narrow local roads, so take travel sickness pills if you are prone to feeling ill.

It’s worth noting that both the airport and the bus station are 1.5 hours to 2 hours drive from downtown Yangon.  It’s really not that far away on a map but the traffic is really bad.

So if you are flying into Yangon on day 1 and heading out on the sleeper bus that same day then it may be worth just staying near the airport/bus station rather than making a journey into town.  Expect to pay around 7,000 kyat for a taxi to the bus station or airport from central Yangon, some negotiating may be needed.

 

What To Do

Yangon is one of those places with very few 'must-do' activities. But it is perfect for exploring by foot, watching the locals, and learn about the local culture.  There is a grassy Maha Bandula Park that you can sit and people watch in, you can explore the streets of China Town, there is an interesting local food night market by the river (maybe don’t eat the food there though unless you like munching on offal broth!), by the night market you can cut through to the water at get a glimpse at the locals being ferried across the water on boats, there is the beautiful Kandawgyi Park and lake to visit in the north east which makes for a lovely afternoon stroll, and finally the most famous of all is the gleaming Golden Temple Shwedagon Paya which is a steep 10,000 kyat entrance fee for tourists only.  It is definitely one of the most epic pagodas we have ever been to in terms of scale and beauty, but if you are on a tight budget then it might deduct from your noodle money!  

The Golden Temple Shwedagon Paya

The Golden Temple Shwedagon Paya

 

Where To Stay

We stayed at the cheap and cheerful 20th Street Hostel in central Yangon near China town.  The hostel was ok, not particularly clean though in the bedroom and Ali had a cockroach on her drying sock! The staff are really helpful though and can arrange your onward journey.  They offer a free breakfast of noodles, fried vegetables and toast which was ok but not the nicest.  It cost 10,800 kyat (£5.75) per night on Hostelworld so didn’t break the bank, and lots of the other accommodation was much more expensive than this.  We would probably recommend staying elsewhere though, especially if your budget allows it.

If you need a place to stay by the airport then we would recommend Roly’s Hostel.  It’s the cheapest we could find in the area at 27,200 kyat (£14.50).  The rooms are spacious, you get a free breakfast and it’s only a ten minute walk to the airport.  The WiFi isn’t the best though, and so we would suggest heading to Life Hotel nearby to borrow their internet for an hour or two. 

 

Where To Eat

We ate some very tasty Shan noodles, a Myanmar culinary speciality, at 999 noodle restaurant on 34th street.  We ordered a bowl of Shan noodles, some Shan yellow rice and some spring rolls and the total bill came to around 5,500 kyat (£2.90).   We would thoroughly recommend this place for a lunchtime dine.

The Shan rice dish at 999 Noodles

The Shan rice dish at 999 Noodles

Vedge Indian Restaurant is a good curry house catering to western tastes.  Between 3 people, we ordered 5 of the cheaper dishes like daals and chickpea curries, 3 types of breads and a boiled rice and the total bill came to 20,600 kyat (£11) with no drinks included.  This was probably one of our more splash out meals during our time in Myanmar, but we had just met a local in the park who wanted to practice his English with us, so we decided to treat him to dinner.  

If you are by the bus station and need somewhere to eat, then Holly Hotel does a great Thai lunch for 3,000 kyat (£1.60) per person for a choice of dishes.  We opted for green Thai curry with noodles, spring rolls and a seaweed and tofu soup which was very tasty.  The restaurant also does mocktails with fresh juice for around 2,500 kyat (£1.30).  The WiFi is good and the place is air conditioned, so if you have a while to wait at the bus station then we would recommend heading there to get out of the heat.

 

Day 2 - 5: 

Ngapali Beach

Beautiful white sands, palm trees and crystal clear waters define the stunning Ngapali beach.  This gem feels particularly unspoilt by tourism even though there is a plethora of luxury resorts that line the beach front.  The only sellers you will get here are the local ladies selling fruit from trays on their heads, and the occasional fisherman offering you a boat trip.  The beach is a lengthy 3km long of flat white sands, and curves round in a scenic arc.  In our 14 years of travelling, neither of us have seen a beach as beautiful as this one. 

The stunning Ngapali beach

The stunning Ngapali beach

If you took the sleeper bus on day 1 then you will be arriving on day 2 bright and early at sunrise to settle into your hostel or resort (hopefully the room is available for you when you arrive!).  If they aren’t ready for you then just dump off your stuff and head to the beach!

You will need to book a bus to Bagan on day 5.  The journey is a really long 24 hours with a 2 hour break sandwiched in between 2 buses, stopping off at Pyay.  Expect to pay around 30,600 kyat - 34,000 kyat (£16.40 - £18.50).

 

What To Do

What is there to do other than to enjoy the marvellous beach time that has presented itself to you?! We really didn’t want to do anything other than to lay on a lounger and enjoy the spectacular scenery around us.  Our hostel didn’t have sun loungers, but you only need to ask at another place and they will most probably let you use one of theirs... the people are so nice here!

Mark enjoying some sweet beach time

Mark enjoying some sweet beach time

You can do a half day boat trip to a few of the small islands, the fisherman’s village and to snorkel, but we got a free one with our hostel and didn’t really rate it.  They took us to a stoney beach to swim, and the water wasn’t very clear for snorkelling so perhaps you are just better off spending more time on the beautiful Ngapali.  The price offered to us for a half day boat trip with one of the locals was $25 USD (£17.75) which quickly fell to 25,000 kyat (£13.33) when we said how expensive it was.

Even though Ngapali beach is a west facing beach so is optimum for sunsets, it is possible to see a sunrise if you head to the very top of the beach.  Mark was very lucky to be gifted with a beautiful sunrise of hazy pink rays when he did an early morning run down the beach front. 

 

Where To Stay

So the accommodation around Ngapali beach is incredibly expensive. Most of it consists of luxury resorts with fancy bungalows for around 188,000 kyat (£100) per night.  We would advise getting your accommodation booked well in advance so you get the most choice when you are searching.  Remember to use Agoda as well as Booking.com and Hostelworld to find some of the cheaper deals.  We stayed in a resort called Gywin Taw in the fisherman’s village down at the end of the beach.  Although the location wasn’t as dreamy (that particular stretch of beach is where the locals dry out fish and there is lots of rubbish and stray dogs), it is only a 5 minute cycle from the nicest part of the beach or a ten minute walk.  The rooms were decent, bungalow style, you get a huge free breakfast of eggs, rice, toast, pancakes, fresh fruit and a hot drink, and the staff go out their way to be helpful to you.  We literally had about 7 people waiting on us!  The resort doesn’t have everything right just yet, but they are working hard to improve things, even offering a free boat trip and free bike hire as part of the package.  The room was 34,000 kyat (£18) per night so was cheap for the area but the location isn’t the nicest.

Gywin Taw resort

Gywin Taw resort

 

Where To Eat

There are so many restaurants to eat at, either on the top end of the beach or just behind on the main strip.  Most specialise in fresh seafood that have been caught that day.  Some restaurants even display their catches at the front of their restaurants in ice buckets!  If you are willing to hunt around you can get a great deal on food.  We stopped off at a restaurant called ‘Treasure’ just on the main road, and we ate like kings for only 60,000 kyat (£3.20).  We only ordered 2 fried noodles with prawns and a green papaya salad, and the staff came out with an additional cocktail each, peanuts, vegetable tempura, fresh fruit and a honey whiskey all for free.  We couldn’t believe it so we went back there the next night and had the same thing.  What an amazing price!  

If your budget allows then splash out on some of the seafood dishes including the Rahkine fish curry.  We also saw many fresh catches such as barracuda, red snapper, crabs and lobster.

There is a selection of cheaper restaurants on the sea front at the top of the beach including Silver Full which offer the same sort of priced dishes.  This is also the cheapest place in town to get cocktails, because every day at 4-6.30pm is happy hour and all cocktails are 1,000 kyat (53p)!  We were pretty drunk on 3 of the things.  Sunset View on the beach front, a couple of restaurants down, do cocktails with 20% off for 1,500 kyat (80p), which was larger but less boozy than those at Silver Full.  The food at Sunset View on the beach actually ended up being the tastiest we found in Ngapali.

It's cocktail time! 

It's cocktail time! 

 

Day 6 - 9: 

Bagan

You will arrive in a bit of a dishevelled state after 24 hours of buses into the lovely area of Bagan.

The ancient town of Bagan is one of Myanmar’s most prized tourist attractions, and is home to where the iconic picture takes place of hot air balloons rising over a temple-littered landscape.  A few days spent exploring the crumbling ruins of the ancient temples is like no other, you just need to grab a bike or an e-scooter and get out into the dusty landscape.  Bagan is undoubtably on the top of any travellers bucket list, and so going in peak season can make the experience a lot less special when shared with so many people, so we would recommend going in January/ February time when the crowds have died down a little.  The street sellers can be a bit annoying too and very persistent, but once you see a sunrise or sunset over Bagan, all the nuances will float away.

On one of the temple roofs watching a sunset

On one of the temple roofs watching a sunset

Entrance to the ‘Bagan Archaeological Zone’ is a steep 25,000 kyat (£13.40) each, and you will be ticketed on your arrival to Bagan.

The sleeper bus will drop you off at the bus station so you will need to get a tuk tuk into town unless you are happy to walk 5km, perhaps in the dark.  The drivers really try to rip you off here, so negotiate hard.  The cheapest we could get a ride for was a pricy 3,000 kyat (£1.60) each and that was on a horse drawn cart!

When you arrive in Bagan, get your hostel or one of the agents on the main road to book your onward bus journey to Mandalay on day 9 at around lunch time.  The journey takes around 5 hours and costs 9,000 kyat (£4.80).

 

What To Do

The main thing to do in Bagan is to explore the temples at ground level, so either hire a cycle bike or E-bike daily from your hostel or a rental shop on the main strip.  Expect to pay around 1,500-2,000 kyat (80p - £1.07) for a push bike and 8,000 kyat (£4.27) for an E-bike per day.  If you are hiring a cycle bike then you may want to check that it has lights because you will be out in the dark almost every day either before sunrise or after sundown.

li exploring inside the ancient temples

li exploring inside the ancient temples

In recent years, tourists have been allowed to climb up inside of the temples and walk around the upper levels to watch the sunset.  In 2017 however, the government decided that they no longer wanted this to happen because of the damage being caused and so it is no longer allowed.  Although there are still temples that the stairwells have been left open on, so every day the tourists ride around trying to find these temples to bag themselves a good spot for watching sun down later on.  It’s half the fun of cycling round, trying to find a temple that’s still open that you can go up.  The security don’t generally seem to mind that you are up there, they just occasionally pop round to check that everyone has paid for an entrance pass.

Mount Popa is a half day trip that you can do to a monastery on top of a mountain, but we did this trip and wouldn’t really recommend it.  The accent by stairs is easy and takes around 30 minutes.  The whole sight is infested with monkeys, they aren’t terribly bothered by visitors but there is monkey crap pretty much everywhere and the monestary is very shabby.  If you plan to go to Mandalay Hill then this is a similar experience and a much nicer one! 

There is also the morning market which is worth a trip to which covers everything from longyi (a traditional woman’s skirt) to daily groceries like fruit and veg.

 
Getting lost in the market

Getting lost in the market

 

If you want to splash out then you can do the hot air balloon ride over Bagan for sunrise.  It’s a pricy $350 USD but is a once in a lifetime experience.  Maybe next time!

 

Where To Stay

We stayed at Shwe Na Di Guesthouse which was a great place to stay.  The WiFi is rubbish but the breakfast makes up for it!  It’s a lovely free breakfast of omelet, toast, churros, tea/coffee and fresh fruit and it’s fine to ask for more of anything if you want it.  One day Mark ate 3 plates of churros and syrup on his own!  When we arrived early morning of day 6, the owners gave us a free brekkie even though we didn’t have a room until that evening.  The room price was a bargain 22,000 kyat (£11.80) which was half the price of what everyone else paid, when booked on Agoda.  Make sure you hunt around for the best deal.

 

Where To Eat

There are loads of places to eat at around Thi Ri Pyitsaya 4 Street, and there you will be able to find western restaurants, Myanmar and Thai cusine, and then also the cheaper local tea shops that sell noodles.  

We ate at on of the local tea shops on that road and ordered Shan Noodles for 1,000 kyat each, and a green papaya salad for the same price.  They also did these delicious pastries filled with sugar and bean curd which were a highlight for 500 kyat a piece.

The delicious sugary pastries

The delicious sugary pastries

Tourists rave about Weatherspoon’s restaurant (funny name to choose what with the weathspoons in the U.K. being so shabby), which is jam packed every night but we found the menu a little expensive for our backpacking budget.

If you look around then you can find some cheaper Thai and Burmese food in the western style restaurants.

 

Day 9 - 11: 

Mandalay 

After an easy 5 hour drive from Bagan, you will arrive in Mandalay, one of Myanmar’s most modern cities after being totally destroyed during WW2.  Mandalay is never going to win any contests for being a good-looking city because of it's hectic rebuild, it’s pretty standard in a lot of ways, high rise buildings, lots of traffic and not very much to see, but there’s something interesting about it.  It’s great to explore some of the more local areas where there are markets, street food and temples.  You don’t need very long here, but it’s a nice way to break up the more outdoorsy places of Ngapali, Bagan, Kalaw and Inle Lake.  

 
A reason to come to Mandalay - the Mandalay Hill temple

A reason to come to Mandalay - the Mandalay Hill temple

 

To get to our next stop Kalaw, you can either take an overnight sleeper, or a shared cab, both of which were out of our price range.   So we decided to take the train instead, spending one night in Thazi between trains.  The route from Thazi to Kalaw is a slow train and is incredibly scenic, we thought even more stunning then our journey on the Trans Siberian train some months before! If you want to get the train then you will need to book your ticket to Thazi from the main train station in Mandalay at 5pm on day 11.  The train takes only 3 hours and is a cheap 2,000 kyat (£1.07) per person for upper class.  You will need to get to the station half an hour before the train departs. 

 

What To Do

There are plenty of things to do in Mandalay for a couple of days of being there, the only issue is that everything is very spaced out.  You can hire a taxi driver for the day, we think they are around $65 USD, but for our budget cycle bikes would be the only way we could get around at an affordable price.  Our hotel rented us bikes for 3,000 kyat (£1.60) each, and although the roads are busy, we thought that it was safe enough to cycle as long as you were being careful at the traffic light-less junctions.

The main attraction here is to head to Mandalay Hill for sunset, it takes 45 minutes to walk up and the likely chances are that some monks will want to walk up with you the whole way to practice their English.  Entry to the temple at the top is 1,000 kyat (53p), and is one of the most beautiful temples in all of Myanmar.

Monks on Mandalay Hill

Monks on Mandalay Hill

You can visit Kuthodaw Pagoda for free nearby, to see the worlds largest book.  

The Mandalay Zoological Gardens is a mere 2,000 kyat (£1.07) entry and has some amazing animals from hippos to Bengali tigers, and gibbons to alligators.  Nearly all animals in the zoo are native to Myanmar.  It’s worth noting though that the conditions of some of the cages aren’t really up to scratch and at one point some there was an elephant dance show for visitors, which was pretty sad.  We did enjoy most of it though because you are so close to the animals.  At home you wouldn’t be able to touch a hippo!

Most people head over to U-Bein Bridge for sunset but it is about 20km away from town so you need to get a cab.  We decided to try and cycle there and ended up stopping on the north east side of the lake which makes for an amazing sunset with a view of U-Bein bridge in the distance.  We would say that being on the north east side on Yandanabon Kyuang Street would make a great alternative if you wanted somewhere more peaceful to watch sunset from (minus the road nearby).

 
Watching the sunset over the lake in Mandalay

Watching the sunset over the lake in Mandalay

 

Our favourite bit of visiting Mandalay was exploring the villages around Mandalay Kantawgyi lake and the rail track by bike.  We were whizzing though dirt tracks with locals waving at us from outside their houses, it was a really cool experience.  If you head down Kantawgyi Pat Road going east from the lake, and then cycle south on 82nd street, you will be able to see a lot of the locals going about their daily lives.  Keep exploring the small roads to see locals living on the train tracks, vegetable markets and lots of friendly faces.

There is loads more to do in Mandalay if you get a driver and have a bit more cash to spare.  There’s the Shwenandaw Monastery (teak wood monetary), Inwa Ancient City and Umin Thonse Pagoda (30 caves pagoda).

 

Where To Stay

We stayed at Silver Cloud Hotel which was actually great and cost only 17,770 kyat (£9.53) a night.  Our room was clean and every day you get a free all you can eat buffet breakfast of hot foods, fruit and toast.  The location is perfect and relatively close to the train station.  This was the only place on our whole trip where we had decent WiFi.  The rest of the time we could barely pick up an email!  Be aware of this when travelling to Myanmar and book what you can a few days in advance in case you get stuck without internet.

The morning view from Cloud Silver Hotel breakfast room

The morning view from Cloud Silver Hotel breakfast room

 

Where To Eat 

We would say come to Mandalay just to eat at this restaurant! It is a local place serving amazing Indian food for next to nothing.  We ate a biriani, chicken curry, coconut rice, 2 handmade chapattis (you can see 7 people making them there and then) and lots of little extras for 4,000 kyat (2.15)! It was the cheapest Indian we have ever had and the best chapattis in existence.  The restaurant is opposite Unity Hotelon 82nd street and opens at around 4pm daily. 

All of this for £2.15!

All of this for £2.15!

Paradise Restaurant on 66th street east of the moat is a local place serving bbq and Myanmar cuisine, and we ate fried Malaysian Noodles, chicken curry, a zingy seaweed salad and 3 Myanmar draught beers for 10,400 kyat (£5.60).  The food was tasty and the restaurant was really busy with locals, which is a good sign. 

 

Day 11 - 12: 

Thazi 

Your train from Mandalay will arrive into Thazi at 8pm that same day.  This is only really an overnight stopover before getting the train again the next day to Kalaw.  

The epic train journey from Thazi to Kalaw

The epic train journey from Thazi to Kalaw

It’s a ten minute walk from Thazi station into town, and one of the first places you will see is the Moonlight Guesthouse where you can rest your head for the night for as little as 12,000 kyat (£6.40) for a basic room. Technically breakfast isn’t included in the economy room, but if you ask nicely then the owners may make you a packed lunch for the next morning.  Maybe leave a little tip if they go out their way to do so. 

If you feel like a little tipple then why not join the locals in one of the bars, they seemed pretty happy to see us and one guy even bought us some dried meat as a present!

Get to the station for 6.20am the next morning on day 12 and book your onward journey to Kalaw by slow train, it leaves at 7am.  The route takes 6 hours and costs 1,850 kyat (£1.00) per person for upper class.  This train ride is honestly one of the most epic routes we have ever been on, winding through jungles, countryside and mountains so enjoy it!  The train also stops in many local villages where you can pick up some snacks and noodles along the way.  It’s a lot of fun with the open sides and reclining seats on the train.

 

Day 12 - 14: 

Kalaw 

The town of Kalaw is nothing special in itself, but ended up being one of our favourite places to relax in Myanmar.  The local food is tasty and cheap, the town is surrounded by beautiful pine forests and countryside, and this is the starting place of the 3 day trek to Inle Lake.  There are tourists here, but it’s not nearly as popular as some of the other places we visited.  You could easily spend 3-4 days here just enjoying the peace and quiet and exploring the surrounding green area.

The green woodlands surrounding Kalaw

The green woodlands surrounding Kalaw

After taking the train from Thazi, you will arrive into Kalaw at 1.15pm on day 12.  We would recommend heading into town after dropping your stuff off at your guesthouse to book onto a 2 or 3 day trek to Inle.  If you book your tour for day 14, then you will have the afternoon of day 12, and another full day to enjoy the delights of Kalaw. There are loads of companies that offer the trek, and all of them take the same trekking route to Inle except for one company which takes you through different villages but charges about double the price for the privilege.  We ended up going with Eagle Tours because they have a fairly good reputation online, but we would say that our guide was a bit lack lustre.  Our trek cost $55 USD per person for 3 days plus a $10 entrance fee to Inle Lake, and it was just us two on the trek for that price.  Have a hunt around and see which one suits you.  If you want to go cheap and don’t mind trekking with a lot of people, then Ever Smile tours is your best bet for 44,000 kyat (£23.60) per person plus the $10 USD entrance fee.

 

What To Do

Kalaw is the perfect place to relax, eat local food and do some short walks into the countryside.  There is a fresh produce and flower market on every 5th day in the centre of town, and every day there is a standard market also selling clothes, snacks, trinkets etc.

It is possible to walk to the nearby MyintMathi caves which is a 2 hour walk one way through pine forests, ox-cart dirt tracks and through a minority village which is very pleasant indeed.  We have written up the instructions for the walk here from Kalaw town.  You can also walk up to a viewpoint from near the village which takes an additional 3 hours total, so all in all a 7 hour trek from Kalaw with the caves included.  It is possible to walk to another viewpoint, a 3 hour walk one way, from Kalaw town, and the view expands across the hilly countryside of clementine orchards and tea plantations.  If you want to do this walk then ask one of the locals which direction to head to, you don’t need a guide for these walks.

The ox-cart track on the way to the MyintMathi caves

The ox-cart track on the way to the MyintMathi caves

 

Where To Stay

We stayed at Thitaw Lay House which was one of the best places we have stayed in 6 months on the road.  We turned up to be offered a free upgrade to the family room, and because we booked last minute we got the room for a reduced rate of 26,600 kyat (£14.25).  The room was beautiful, solid wood floors, ethnic throws on the beds and ginormous, and the guesthouse has some very well maintained gardens just outside.  Every morning they would feed us a free breakfast of home-made banana bread, fresh bread that they had made in a wood burning oven, either a fried egg or cheese slice, vege fried rice, homemade jam, butter and a hot drink.  It was honestly the best breakfast ever!

Us in our room in Thitaw Lay House

Us in our room in Thitaw Lay House

 

What To Eat

Food is great in Kalaw, there are quite a few western restaurants if your budget allows or dirt cheap tea shops selling noodles and fried goods.  We ate at Parami restaurant on Min Street and ordered 2 chapattis, sweet potato leaf salad, okra and 2 bowls of Shan Noodles for only 3,700 kyat (£2.00) and it was delicious.  We actually ate there a few times in a row because it was so cheap and tasty!  We also ate at Picasso Healthy Spa and Restaurant, a Mexican restaurant, which was very fresh and tasty, but the portion sizes were a bit on the small side.  We ordered a vege burrito, 2 nachos and a vege quesadilla for 10,000 kyat (£5.35).  The avocado around this area is unbelievably tasty because it is grown here, make sure you try some in one of the restaurants.

Shan noodles in Parami restaurant

Shan noodles in Parami restaurant

The street food is actually great in the centre of Kalaw. We sampled a chickpea crispy pancake for 300 kyat (16p), pancakes with sugar for 250 kyat (13p), vege samosas for 100 kyat (5p) and our all time favourite coconut crumpets for 200 kyat (10p).  If you want some cheap and tasty snacks then there are loads of bits to choose from.

 

Day 14 - 16: 

3 Day Trek From Kalaw To Inle Lake

Leave on the morning of day 14 with your guide and tour group and make the long journey by foot to Inle Lake.  We are avid trekkers so didn’t find it too challenging, it was just lovely to get lost in thought whilst walking through the hilly countryside of Myanmar.  Your tour operator should have arranged to take your big backpacks to the end of the route so you will only be trekking with a day bag filled with the things you need for the next few days.  Make sure you have sun cream, a sun hat and a change of clothes in case it rains.  Taking a mozzie net is a good idea for sleeping under.  You can probably trek in trainers if it is dry, but we took our walking boots because they were comfier for the longer distance.  

On the 3 day trek from Kalaw to Inle Lake

On the 3 day trek from Kalaw to Inle Lake

The food on our trek was amazing, the local people feed you like kings!  4 types of fruit at one sitting and freshly prepared salads, we felt so lucky at the end of it to have been given some much.  You also need to take 1 litre of bottled water which you can replace at several intervals during the trek.

The scenery is very diverse, going from reservoirs to forests, views of tea plantations on the hills to trekking on the train tracks.  We loved crossing the rice paddies where the buffalos were grazing, this was probably our favourite part of the walk.

The boat trip at the end across Inle Lake is super fun, our driver was really speedy so we had massive grins on our faces as we bounced along the water, waves splashing out from either side of the boat.  

Speeding along on a boat on Inle Lake

Speeding along on a boat on Inle Lake

It is also possible to do this trek over 2 days if you don’t want to do 3, the tour operator will just drop you slightly further into the route by tuk tuk.  If you want to do a 2 day trek from Kalaw on your own then you can find instructions on how to do it here.

We loved the trek but perhaps we weren’t ready for the number of other tourists we had to share it with.  On our second day we came across about 10 other groups on the route, some of them made of 12 people, and apparently some 20 groups will stay in the same village at any one time.  Although this isn’t a problem as such, it felt decidely un-special to be doing the same as everyone else, to be in the countryside ‘on tour’.  If you can get your guide to leave any earlier in the morning to avoid the crowds then it’s probably a good idea.  Otherwise you may get stuck behind big groups if you are walking faster than them.

 

Day 16 - 19: 

Inle Lake

So after lunch at the end of your trek you will take the boat over Inle to arrive in the city of Nyaungshwe around early afternoon.  Head to your hostel and give your legs a well deserved break after 3 long days of trekking.

Nyaungshwe is an alright place to chill out, eat some tasty food and this area is popular because it’s the cheaper backpacker destination close to Inle Lake.  It’s mainly just set up for tourists, there’s bar upon bar lining the streets, loads of western restaurants to choose from, hostels and hotels, tour agencies, and places to hire bikes from.  We didn’t love it, but it does seem like the most affordable place to base yourself for access to the highlight, that is Inle Lake.

Inle’s glistening waters are breathtakingly beautiful, and you can see why this is one of Myanmar’s most loved sights.  Surrounded by mountains on the east and west sides, the scenery is unrivalled and one of the most stunning places we have ever been.  Bamboo housed villages hover over the waters on wooden stilts, and locals wash themselves in the alluring waters.  Fishermen paddle using one leg, making a scooping motion to move themselves along the surface.

 
A posing fisherman on Inle Lake

A posing fisherman on Inle Lake

 

To arrange the next step of the journey, get your hostel or an agent to book your return coach journey to Yangon on day 19 in the afternoon.  We searched around for the cheapest prices and went with Full Moon coaches, where a 3 across VIP sleeper was 18,000 kyat (£9.65), or a 4 across VIP sleeper was 13,000 kyat (£7.00) and because there wasn’t enough people on the cheaper one, they upgraded everyone to the 3 across coach for free.  The journey takes 12 hours and leaves at 3pm from Nyaungshwe.

 

What To Do

Go on a boat tour.  This is the must-do thing at Inle Lake and is really easy to organise.  Just get your hostel to book it for you, or if you want to hunt around then there are loads of agencies that can arrange it for you, or local boat men walking around offering boat hire.  The main thing to be aware of is that the boat hire is generally cheap but the drivers get commission on where they take you, so they want to drop you off in their mates restaurant or shop, which can be very annoying.  You will need to discuss with your driver beforehand if you can make your own itinerary.  Expect to pay from 15,000 kyat (£8.05) to 24,000 kyat (£12.90) for an all day hire on a boat.  The more people you get then the cheaper it is.  We would recommend visiting the following places on your boat tour: the lotus root weaving factory in Phaw Khone, the middle of the lake to catch some fishermen in action, the boat makers workshop, one of the local markets (not the floating market), the Inn Tain Monastery and bamboo forest in the west, the Nga Hpe Kyuang wooden jumping cat monastery (although there are only about 6 cats when we visited and none of them were jumping!) and the floating gardens.  We would say give the silver smiths, the long neck weavers, the cigar makers and the umbrella makers a miss. There are loads of beautiful villages to visit which are hovering over the water on stilts, like the Nampans or Maing Tauk villages, and a canal network which is almost like a boat road system.

A cat at the Nga Hpe Kyuang jumping cat monastery

A cat at the Nga Hpe Kyuang jumping cat monastery

You can hire a bike from Nyaungshwe and do some cycling to nearby villages and the countryside.  Bikes cost around 1,500 kyat (80p) from a local shop. 

Get a massage in Win Nyant for an experience of a lifetime! Be prepared for the masseur to stand on you with their full body weight, pinch and grab your muscles through clothes.  It was pretty funny watching Mark’s pained expression for an hour and worth the 7,000 kyat (£3.75).

 

Where To Stay

We stayed at the Green Valley Inn Guesthouse in Nyaungshwe and the place was good value for money, including a breakfast of eggs, toast, churros, fruit and tea/coffee.  The staff are really friendly and look after their guests.  There are loads of hotels and guest houses around Inle depending on your budget, and if you can splash out then it may be worth staying in one of the bamboo huts actually on the lake itself rather than staying in the city.  We have heard that the south side of the lake is much quieter and very scenic, whereas there is a lot of boat action in the north.

 

Where To Eat 

Namastee Indian restaurant do an amazing set menu of meat curry, vege curry, popadom, nan bread, mint yoghurt dip, daal soup and fresh salad for only 3,500 kyat (£1.90) per person and it’s really tasty.  We had that a couple of days in a row because it was such good value for money.

We also went to Mo Sin, a local restaurant, which has a set menu for 4,000 kyat (£2.15) for a bbq’ed meat, rice, small beer and tom yum soup.  Ali skipped the set menu and ordered a Thai vege curry, rice and papaya salad which also came to the same price.

The highlight of our food experience in Inle was a local tea shop on the bottom of Sao San Htun Street where we got 2 bowls of Shan Noodles, pastries filled with sugary coconut bean paste, crispy wonton and bhaji, and a chickpea pancake for a total of 3,000 kyat (£1.60).  You really can’t beat the local food, it’s cheap and ridiculously tasty.  The only problem is that the local tea shops / restaurants were just a bit harder to find in the touristy Nyaungshwe.

The local restaurant we recommend dining at in Nyuangshwe

The local restaurant we recommend dining at in Nyuangshwe

 

Day 20 - 21: 

Yangon

So you will probably arrive in Yangon bus station at the ridiculous hour of 3am after being on the night bus.  From there you will have to negotiate a tuk tuk driver to take you into downtown Yangon, maybe grab some other people to make your journey cheaper.  A taxi normally costs around 7,000 kyat (£3.75), but these guys know you don’t have many other options at this hour so may bump up the price.  Have somewhere to stay booked beforehand so you can head straight there.  If you stay one night in Yangon then that’s probably enough time to soak up the city atmosphere.  All of the other info for What To Do and Where To Eat is at the top of this page.  

Local life in Yangon

Local life in Yangon

That takes us up to day 21 on the itinerary which is your final day in Myanmar.  We hope you have found this guide helpful, you can easily stretch this out into a more leisurely 3 week itinerary if you have the time.

 

Things To Note:

Travel Advice

What with the troubles in the north western part of the country in the Rakhine state, many embassies have advised against all travel to several parts of the country.  The tourist areas of Ngapali beach and Hsipaw are still reachable for tourists, but it’s best to check in advance the conditions of visiting from your government embassy website.  For example, it is possible to travel to Hsipaw by train from Mandalay, but we believe it is not possible to do any trekking in this area at the moment.  Places such as Ngapali beach are under military supervision and so it is necessary to expect passport checks are several points during your journey there.  From our experience of visiting Myanmar during this time, there is nothing to worry about as a tourist.  This is one of the safest countries we have ever visited and the people are some of the friendliest and most peaceful we have met.  (Written January 2018)

 

Time Of Year

We went in January and it was a great, because the earlier crowds visiting in the dry season had dispersed and you got to enjoy lots of the sights with fewer people.  It felt very quiet at times around the touristy restaurant areas in Bagan and Inle Lake, there are obviously quite a lot of travellers but apparently nothing compared to what it is like in November/ December time.   The weather is very pleasant in the day and can get a bit nippy at night times in the countryside, but as long as you take some warm layers there is nothing to worry about.  We didn’t have any problems finding accommodation, in previous years we read that there hasn’t been enough for the number of tourists, but because of the ongoing political situation we believe there are fewer people visiting at the moment.

 

Animals And Insects

There can be quite a few mosquitos in the cities during the dry season and we have heard that there are a lot more during the wet season, in the countryside also.  Check your embassy for advice on Malaria and other mosquito-born diseases.  At the time of visiting, there was a low risk of Malaria in most places in the countryside and none in the cities.  We were take a lot of care not to get bitten, and this time Ali decided to take anti-malarial drugs because she is prone to getting bitten regardless!  

We were told by a trekking guide that there are a lot of snakes in the countryside in the Kalaw area during the months of March and April and that some can be aggressive when near fires.  Local people like to burn their crops and when that happens the snakes make a slithering escape!  So if you are trekking in the countryside at this time your guide should be able to advice whether it is safe to trek that particular route or if you need to take another one.

There are many stray dogs across the whole of Myanmar, and sadly it looks like a lot of them have had a very hard life.  Be careful walking around small streets at nighttime when dogs can become scared and territorial, we carried a stick around with us just in case!  Also there are some cases of Rabies in Myanmar so make sure you check your embassy website for travel advice and get vaccinated.  

 

Conservative Myanmar

Myanmar is a very traditional country where nearly all of the women dress conservatively, wearing Longyi’s (mid calf length wrap skirts) and they cover their shoulders.  As a tourist we think it’s only fair to dress appropriately and follow suit, particularly in the villages.  The only place Ali had her shoulders and knees out was at the beach in Ngapali, and even then the locals were completely covered up, swimming in the sea fully clothed!

 

Food And Drink

Some of the tastiest food we have eaten in Myanmar has come from the local restaurants and tea shops.  Although we wouldn’t necessarily advice eating things like meat from the street vendors, we ate lots of the breaded and fried goods and didn’t have any problems at all.  If the locals are eating there then you are probably fine!  Some of our favourite dishes were Shan noodles, green papaya salad, tea leaf salad, curries, chapattis, avocado salad, churros and papaya.  You can find food as cheap as 400 kyat (22p) for noodles in a tea shop.  A good price for a draught Myanmar beer in a local tea shop is 800 kyat (43p), and 2000 kyat (£1.07) for a large bottle.

 

Transport

It is incredibly easy to organise your travel in Myanmar.  Most hostels can book onward coach journeys for you and you can always pick up a tuk tuk or cab at a bus station.  The journeys by coach can be long and laborious though, the roads can be long and winding in places and the drivers love to play their dance tunes all night long on the loud speakers.  If you are prone to travel sickness then be as prepared as you can be with travel sickness or sleeping pills.  The train is a really nice way to travel, very cheap, but it takes a lot of time compared to the bus.  From our experience, traveling in Myanmar was always to schedule, well organised and straight forward.  You can just arrange it all when you get there unless you want to fly.  When getting a cab or a tuk tuk, you will need to negotiate hard to get a good price, or try to get your hostel to book it for you.  

 

Visa

You will need a visa to enter Myanmar and, due to the political state, there are current restrictions as to where and how you can enter the country.  In January 2018, the only way to enter is to fly into the cities of Yangon, Nyi Pyi Taw or Mandalay, or to cross the border by land at Tachileik, Myawaddy or Kawthaung.  We believe you have to exit the country the same way that you entered and flying is more straight forward than a land border crossing.  Make sure that you research the most up-to-date information on the government embassy website, because the situation may change quickly.  An e-visa cost us $50 USD each and was for 28 days access to the country.

 

We hope you find our guide helpful, we would love to hear from anyone who followed it.  

 

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Myanmar - The Ultimate 2 Week Travel Itinerary For Backpackers, by Studio Mali
 

 

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Video: Myanmar - Yangon & Bagan

Myanmar; we weren't ready for how beautiful, friendly and tasty you would be. I'm not sure we've visited a more video ready country so let us introduce our first of three travel videos that will give you an insight into this special place. First off we have the bustling capital Yangon and then our exploration in the ancient city of Bagan, get ready for some beautiful temples and maybe, just maybe, a few awesome hot air balloons...

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Laos: The Ultimate 2 Week Travel Itinerary For Backpackers

Ali thumbnail sml.jpg
 

Laos, the popular backpackers destination in South East Asia, well trodden since the late 90s.  A country of mountainous jungles, locals in traditional dress and cities so chilled out you may never want to leave.  The country is landlocked, making it slightly more expensive than its neighbours, but it’s still a great place to travel to if you are on a budget. 

Laos

We spent 3 weeks there, covering the 2 main cities Luang Prabang and Vientiane, and then moving onto the hilly countryside in the trekking capital Luang Namtha, the jungles of the Nam Ha National Park, the mountainous Nong Khiaw and Muang Ngoi village.  We have put this itinerary together for a 2 week trip, but if you have more time then you can definitely space it out over a 3 week trip like we did.  We hope you enjoy our itinerary and let us know if you use it! We would love to hear how it went.

 

Day 1-2

Vientiane 

It’s likely that your flight will come into Vientiane as it’s the capital of Laos.  However, we wouldn’t recommend spending much time there, especially if you are planning to head to Luang Prabang which is a lot more scenic.  Vientiane is known as one of the most chilled out and least populated capital cities in Southeast Asia, and that it is, but it’s also pretty unloved, very touristy and we didn’t find it particularly interesting.  

One of the nicer bits!

One of the nicer bits!

Get your hostel to book your sleeper bus to Luang Prabang on the evening of day 2 so you arrive in the morning of day 3.  Tickets cost around 180,000 kip (£15.50) per person for a VIP bus which is a lot comfier than the regular bus.  There's no point in slumming it when you can go VIP for a couple of pounds more!

 

What To Do There

We have written up the bits that we did enjoy in the article below in case you do find yourself mooching round Vientiane…..

Laos: Top Things To Do In Vientiane

Our favourite things were learning to weave in the Houey Hong Vocational Centre For Women, drinking the delicious Laotian coffee, and exploring the city on bikes.  There are quite a few markets you can visit, with the most famous one for tourists being set up every evening by the Mekong river.  The Mekong River is also known for its stunning sunsets, so make sure you get down there one evening with a beer in hand.

Mark learning to weave at the Houey Hong Vocational Centre For Women

Mark learning to weave at the Houey Hong Vocational Centre For Women

 

Where To Stay

We stayed in Ali Backpackers which was perfectly fine, basic and very cheap compared to other hostels.  The location was where most of the touristy cafes and bars are situated.  It cost 133,000 kip (£11.40) per night with breakfast included.  The staff are friendly and can arrange your onward journey but boat or bus.  It wasn't the most inspiring of hostels, but a cheap find in the capital.

 

Where To Eat

We ate in Phakhao restaurant which specialises in traditional Laotian and Thai food.  All dishes were really tasty and actually the stand-out one was a cooked Laotian sausage served with raw garlic, chilli and ginger slices!  We would never munch on raw garlic at home but when teamed with sausage it really was a dream. There are loads of French-style bakeries to grab a coffee and fresh croissant in, and we stopped off in Le Banneton which did delicious pastries.  For true Laotian coffee, just look out for the condensed milk cans stacked up on the street vendors stalls and you will find yourself a punch-packing cup of sweetened coffee.

Croissants in Le Banneton French cafe

Croissants in Le Banneton French cafe

 

Take a look at our travel-inspired design shop!

Day 3

Luang Prabang

Take an overnight sleeper bus from Vientiane to Luang Prabang on day 2 so you arrive in the morning of day 3.  The overnight bus takes around 10-12 hours.  The journey is pretty tough for those prone to travel sickness, the roads are incredibly windy and we had a driver that was heavy on the accelerator and break pedals.  If you opt for the VIP bus then you get your own sleeping chair/pod and it’s 3 people spaced out across the width of the bus.  Check out the neon lights on this bus!

The jazzy VIP sleeper bus from Vientiane to Luang Prabang

The jazzy VIP sleeper bus from Vientiane to Luang Prabang

Have a hostel booked for when you arrive in Luang Prabang so you can head straight there early in the morning.  There are lots of tuk tuks outside of the bus station ferrying people into town, but we decided to walk because it was only a few kilometres away from our hostel.  Remember to haggle if you choose to catch a ride.  Before you leave the bus station, try to book a minibus for the next morning going to Luang Namtha.

Luang Prabang is a really popular city with expats and tourists and it’s easy to see why.  It’s chilled out vibe and location next to the scenic Mekong river is a clear pull for lots of travellers, and it has something for everyone.  Those wanting to enjoy a bucket or two will find lots of cool hang-out bars tucked away in the side streets, and for the more adventurous it’s possible to trek straight into the jungle from the city.  Although we thought Luang Prabang had a nice feel to it, we found it very touristy and in places it was difficult to see any local culture because it’s so developed with western-style bars.  We would still recommend going though, and it’s a much nicer place to be over it’s ugly sister city Vientiane.  For now just spend one night in Luang Prabang because you will be coming back here at the end of the trip.  If you weren’t able to book a mini van to Luang Namtha whilst you were at the bus station then get your hostel to book it for you. They will take a bit of a commission but a tuk tuk will be included to get you to the bus station.

View of Luang Prabang

View of Luang Prabang

 

What To Do

There are loads of things to do in and around Luang Prabang depending on what your interests are and how much time you have.  We were happy not to do much when we were there other than to just soak up the atmosphere and wonder around a bit.  You can do jungle trekking from here on organised tours, trips down the Mekong river by kayak or boat, cookery classes, visit numerous exquisite Buddhist temples, mountain biking, a trip over the rickety bamboo bridge, visiting the handicraft night market.  You could easily spend a week there exploring what it has to offer and relaxing.  There is also the nearby Kuang Si waterfalls which is a lovely trip for a morning or afternoon.  The turquoise coloured waters are absolutely stunning and if you bring your costume you can go for a dip!  Again your hostel should be able to arrange transport for you, expect to pay around 40,000 kip (£3.40) for a minivan return journey.  Entry to the waterfall is an additional 20,000 kip (£1.70).

The stunning Kuang Si waterfalls

The stunning Kuang Si waterfalls

 

Where To Stay

We stayed in ThaViSouk hostel which was ok.  The staff are really friendly and helpful, but our dorm room wasn’t the most comfortable because it was baking hot at night.  It cost 54,000 kip (£4.65) for a dorm bed per person per night, and that seemed to be the cheapest we could find online, and double rooms in Luang Prabang were generally much more expensive.  When we came back to Luang Prabang later on in the trip, we opted to splash out for a few nights over Christmas in a place called Frangipani.  This guesthouse is wonderful, the staff are really sweet and the room we stayed in was very pimping with its own balcony and view of the Mekong.  This set us back 332,000 kip (£28.50) per night, but that was an inflated price over the festive period.  We would 100% recommend staying there!

 

Where to Eat

There is honestly hundreds of restaurants and cafes you can eat in, so choosing a good one would not be so difficult.  We opted for quite a few meals in local Laotian noodles kitchens, and other outdoor eateries where you can pick up a Thai curry with rice for as little as 25,000 kip (£2.15).  At the west end of the night market, there are lots of food stalls selling pre-plated dishes for the bargain price of 10,000 kip (85p) each, and you can choose from fried rice, noodles, spring rolls and also bbq’ed goods on sticks which cost a bit more.  There are lots of fresh juice and smoothy stalls for 10,000 kip (85p) a drink, and the Redbull Bar (sports bar) offers 2 draught beers for 15,000 kip (£1.50) which was the cheapest we saw.  Our favourite cheap eat however was a Chinese noodle kitchen we found on Khem Khonsu road at the Kitsalat road crossover where you could get a delicious tasting bowl of noodles, meat and fresh vegetables for only 20,000 kip (£1.70).  We must say that the Chinese noodles are a lot tastier than the Laotian equivalent! For a bit of a splash out meal, we would recommend the local Riverside BBQ Restaurant on Khem Khong road which is an all you can eat buffet and cook it yourself restaurant.  The food was incredibly fresh and you could opt for a whole array of ingredients from fresh prawns to 4 types of mushroom. It was 65,000 kip £5.60 per person which is an amazing price when you think about it!

All you can eat BBQ for 65,000 kyat!

All you can eat BBQ for 65,000 kyat!

 

Day 4

Luang Namtha

On the morning of day 4 take a minibus out of Luang Prabang and head for Luang Namtha, the trekking capital of Laos.  Again the roads are pretty tough, winding round hills and the surface can be pretty bad.  It takes approx 8 hours with a fast driver and costs 130,000 kip (£11.15) when booked through a hostel.

Luang Namtha has just one main strip of shops, hotels and tour operators, so when you arrive late afternoon just head to one of the tour operators to look into treks. 

 

What To Do

Luang Namtha itself isn’t anything special, but it is the gateway to jungle treks in the stunning Nam Ha National Park and lots of other outdoorsy activities such as kayaking, zip lining, mountain biking etc.  Depending on how many days you want to trek for and what your budget is, you will be able to find a tour that suits you.  After doing some research online we heard that you really get what you pay for and it’s not worth going dirt cheap.  We chose to do a 3 day tour with Laos Forest Retreat because their reviews were the best on Trip Advisor and we would say from experience that they did deliver.  On signing up for the tour, we didn’t know if anyone else would be joining us, but luckily another 3 people signed on and we were ready to go the next morning with 5 people.  It cost $105 each for 3 days including everything from food to kayaking, to guides and accommodation.  There are definitely tours cheaper than this available with other companies, and the more people that sign up the cheaper it is.  A good thing to do is to visit each of the operators and find out what tours people have already signed up for.

Jungle trekking in the Nam Ha National Park

Jungle trekking in the Nam Ha National Park

 

Where To Stay

There are loads of places to stay in Luang Namtha and we would advise just turning up and booking it there and then for the best deal.  Prices of rooms can be negotiated down and we managed to get a double room with our own bathroom and aircon for 60,000 kip (£5.15) per night down from the first price of 80,000 kip (£6.85).

 

Where To Eat

The best place we found to eat for budget travellers was at the night market, where you can find a bowl of Laotian noodles for 10,000 kip (85p).  The eateries at the front closest by the entrance seem to be the most expensive and the cheaper ones are at the back.  They also have stalls for bbq’ed banana with coconut inside and crepes, but we found both of them dry and a bit disappointing!  The food however on the jungle trek was so amazing, fresh and tasty.  It was probably some of the best food we ate in Laos!

Jungle food on our 3 day trek

Jungle food on our 3 day trek

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Day 5-8

Nam Ha National Park

We opted for a 3 day trek through the national park with a morning of kayaking through one of the rivers.  On the morning of day 5, we headed to our tour operators office first thing for breakfast and then they drove us an hour out to start our trek in the national park. Trekking in the jungle is amazing and is very different to all the other treks we have done previously in mountainous regions and countryside.  It feels really wild and is a lot of fun! 

Day 1 one of the tour was mostly trekking and eating some delicious food our guides had prepared.  That night we stayed in a homestay at a village in the middle of the jungle and got a glimpse into jungle life.  

Day 2 of the tour was a morning of kayaking down a river, tackling a few rapids and stopping off at some remote villages along the way.  We would thoroughly recommend a bit of kayaking in your tour package.  The afternoon was spent trekking up to a viewpoint and then back down to our next village for a nights rest. We watched the guides cook some food on the fire including frogs they had caught from the river! 

A froggy breakfast in the Nam Ha National Park

A froggy breakfast in the Nam Ha National Park

Day 3 was the most challenging of treks and we walked for quite a few hours until we got to picked up and taken back to Luang Namtha by our guides.  We have written up our experience of the jungle which you may helpful...

Laos: 3 Wild Days In The Nam Ha Jungle, by Studio Mali

When you get back from the tour, spend one more night in Luang Namtha before heading to Nong Khiaw the next morning.  You can book your minibus ticket to Nong Khiaw from one of the tour operators on the high street.  It costs around 65,000 kip (£5.60) per person with a transfer to the bus station included.

Kayaking in the Nam Ha National Park

Kayaking in the Nam Ha National Park

 

Day 9-10

Nong Khiaw

On day 9, take a minibus early to Nong Khiaw which is 6 hours drive away.  Nong Khiaw is a beautiful sleepy town set on the Nam Ou River with the backdrop of the lusciously green limestone mountains.  It is the perfect place to unwind for a few days, with the option of exploring the area by boat or foot.  It doesn’t feel as touristy as Luang Prabang or Vientiane, but there are enough small restaurants and cafes that cater to western tastes.

The relaxing Nong Khiaw

The relaxing Nong Khiaw

 

What To Do

There are many organised treks that you can do from here including the popular 100 Waterfalls Trek which is a day trip.  We booked this through Tiger Trail for 200,000 kip (£17.20) per person and there was 6 people in our group.  We had a fun time doing the 100 Waterfalls trek, and ended up facing some fears after getting a bit piddled on jungle juice.  Read about our experience here...

Laos - Jungle Juice, Waterfalls And Facing Fears In Nong Khiaw, By Studio Mali

Our personal highlight in Nong Khiaw was climbing up to the 360 degree viewpoint which overlooks the town and landscape.  It’s a 40 minute accent if you are fit and used to trekking, and we would highly recommend heading there for sunset.  We heard that the steam room and massage place on the way to the viewpoint was good, but unfortunately we didn’t have time to visit, maybe next time!  You can also do a trip out by boat to another small town called Muang Ngoi which we will chat about later.

The viewpoint in Nong Khiaw

The viewpoint in Nong Khiaw

 

Where To Stay

There is loads of accommodation in Nong Khiaw and some can be found at very good prices.  We would say just turn up and find something there and then.  We chose to stay about a ten minute walk from the station in our first guesthouse which was nice because we got a river view bamboo hut overlooking the town on the other side of the water.  The hut had its own balcony which caught the afternoon rays. The second place we stayed at was on the other side of the bridge, again close to the water but the view wasn’t quite as good and it didn’t get the afternoon sun.  Both rooms cost 60,000 kip (£5.15) per night and were basic bamboo huts with WiFi and a hot shower.

 

Where To Eat

You must eat at Delilah’s for breakfast.  They have an incredible menu to choose from of pancakes, porridge, cooked breakfasts, baguettes, granola and nearly everything is homemade including the bread.  Breakfast range from 20,000 kip (£1.70) to 35,000 kip (£3.00).  They also have some very tasty homemade cakes that are served all day till 11pm including apple crumble with coconut ice cream and banoffee pie.  For dinner, we would recommend eating at Coco’s, the food is fresh and tasty and the setting is nice.  We opted for river weed, river fish and yellow curry all of which were very good, but the stand out dishes were the papaya salad and mango coconut sticky rice for pudding.  There is also a tasty Indian restaurant on the other side of the bridge on the left hand side which is worth a visit.  

A Delilah's breakfast - porridge with banana, milk, maple syrup, sugar and cinnamon

A Delilah's breakfast - porridge with banana, milk, maple syrup, sugar and cinnamon

 

Day 11

Muang Ngoi

Catch the 10.30am boat to Muang Ngoi from Nong Khiaw boat station.  The trip takes about 1 hour 20 mins on a local boat and costs 25,000 kip (£2.15).  The boat ride isn’t so comfortable, but the views make up for it.  Mango Ngoi is a scenic little town further along the river, and is much less developed than Nong Khiaw.  There aren’t any cars there, only bikes, and so it’s a very peaceful place to walk around.  Again, it’s set against the backdrop of the stunning limestone cliffs, and the dirt roads running through the village make you feel as though you’re stepping back in time.  We stayed for only one night here, but really it is probably better to stay for 2, because you only really get a half day to explore the surrounding area.  When you awake the next morning, you need to get down to the boat station for 8am sharp to make sure you book your tickets that morning for the return boat to Nong Khiaw.  It was really busy at 8am when it opens and you don’t want to risk getting stuck in Muang Ngoi.  The boat leaves at 9.30am, and is 1 hour 20 mins back to Nong Khiaw.

Muang Ngoi

Muang Ngoi

 

What To Do

There are plenty of walks to do from the village.  A popular one is to head towards Tham Kang Cave which takes 40 minutes, and then onto a much more remote village called Bana where you will be greeted by smiling locals (a further 30 minutes).  The walk takes around 3 hours total there and back with some time spent in the cave and village, so will take up most of the afternoon.  There is a viewpoint you can ascend which is a sweaty 1.5 hours up, we didn’t get a chance to do it but we heard it was a stunner.  You can also hire bikes to explore more of the surrounding villages, including Bana, Huay Bo and Huay Sen.  Muang Ngoi is a quiet village, but there are plenty of restaurants and bars catering to westerners, so if you are happy to relax in a bar for a few hows enjoying the sunshine then you will have a great time here.  The locals are a little unfriendly but hey, you can’t have everything!

 

Where To Sleep

As soon as you get off the boat you will be approached by many locals trying to offer you a room for the night.  You can either follow one of them, or you can continue walking straight ahead into town to try and find your own place to stay.  We weren’t really that fussed where we were sleeping (as long as it was cheap) so we followed one of the local ladies to Aloune Guesthouse where we stayed in a wooden bungalow for 60,000 kip (£5.15) per night with a river view.  You can’t get much better than that!  We also read online that if you are after an even cheaper room for the night then if you ask around to the owners of restaurants then sometimes you can bag yourself a double room for 20,000 kip (£1.70). When looking for a room, you just need to find out if they have hot showers, electricity, a mosquito net and wifi if you want it.

Chilling in a hammock at Aloune Guesthouse

Chilling in a hammock at Aloune Guesthouse

 

Where To Eat

The Bee Tree Restaurant at the very end of the highstreet does amazing food and cocktails, and every day from 5pm they do a happy hour.  The setting is really lovely, they have a cool hang out space in the garden and they get a fire going later on when it gets a bit chilly.  We opted for the Laos Laos Sours, which were 2 for 25,000 kip (£2.15), and a few hours down the line we had gotten through 5 each, recorded a Christmas quiz for our friends at home, and had munched on some Laotian curries which went done a bit too well!  We wish every town had a Bee Tree restaurant.  We also saw a place on the main strip that did wood fired pizzas but it wasn’t open that evening for whatever reason.  Breakfast in Riverside Bar and Restaurant was also nice, we opted for a fruit porridge made of rice, pineapple, banana and coconut, and we think condensed milk because it tasted so naughty!  We saw there was an all you can eat breakfast for 20,000 kip (£1.83) if you book the night before just on the main strip, but didn’t get a chance to visit.

 

 

Unique designs, that you can’t find on the highstreet….

Day 12

Nong Khiaw 

Take the 9.30am boat back to Nong Khiaw which will take around 1 hour 20 mins.  Enjoy the last boat ride down the very scenic Nam Ou river, it’s very James Bond in places.  If you want to at this point, you can head straight to the bus station and take a minivan or tuk tuk back to Luang Prabang, but we chose to stay another day in the chilled out Nong Khiaw.

Mark chilling on a boat ride from Nong Khiaw

Mark chilling on a boat ride from Nong Khiaw

 

Day 13-14

Luang Prabang

First thing in the morning, make your way over to the bus station in Nong Khiaw.  Your options are to either get a 4 hour ride crammed in a tuk tuk back to Luang Prabang (which sounds like our idea of hell), or to get one of the mini vans which take only 3 hours in much more comfortable seats.  The first minivan starts at around 7.30am, and everything gets booked up pretty fast! As soon as a tuk tuk or van gets filled, it will just leave regardless of what time it was scheduled in for.  So the last minivan for the day was scheduled in for 1.30pm, but actually it left at 11.30am!  Both cost between 40,000/50,000 kip (£3.66-£4.57) and sometimes they may make you pay for empty seats if you want to leave earlier then the scheduled time.  

Whatever you fancy doing on your last couple of days in Laos you will be able to find it in the chilled out traveller haven of Luang Prabang.  

A Luang Prabang sunset

A Luang Prabang sunset

 

Other Things To Note:

Chilly Nights

It can get really cold in Laos at night times, especially out in the countryside, so make sure you take some warm clothing and maybe a sleeping bag if you tend to get very cold at night.  Many nights it was around 3 degrees when we were sleeping in bamboo huts and in the jungle, so make sure you aren’t freezing like we were!

 

Land Mines

Laos is surprisingly the most bombed country in the world and there are still thousands of unexploded land mines scattered across the landscape.  It’s not necessarily something to worry about but something that you should be aware of.  Just make sure that you always stick to the trekking paths and always go with a local guide.

It's fine to trek, just always make sure you are with a local guide

It's fine to trek, just always make sure you are with a local guide

 

Grub

We wouldn’t say that the Laotian food is the tastiest ever but there are plenty of authentic Thai dishes to choose from at tourists restaurants.  You can’t go wrong with a Thai curry!

 

Tourist Central

If you are looking for somewhere to travel to that is quiet of tourists then this isn’t the place for you.  There is such a traveller hub in the cities that sometimes it can be hard to see the local way of life.  Although we liked Laos and thought that the countryside was very stunning, we have preferred travelling around other neighbouring countries such as China and Thailand. It sometimes feels as though the Laotian way of life has stopped for the tourists, which is a bit sad.  

 

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Laos - The Ultimate 2 Week Travel Itinerary For Backpackers, by Studio Mali
 

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Laos: Top Things To Do In Vientiane

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Laos capital city Vientiane is known for its chilled out pace and cafe culture, sitting itself next to the Mekong river.  The size of it makes it feel more like a town rather than a city, and can be explored in a couple of days by foot or bike.  

That Luang Tai Temple

That Luang Tai Temple

A Grey Start

After a wonderful month spent in China’s scenic Yunnan Province with only a handful of tourists in sight, arriving in Vientiane was a huge culture shock for us.  We were unfortunate to visit when the weather was dull, the sky was grey and the mood felt a bit flat.  The city feels unloved in places; litter scatters the banks of the Mekong River and even though it's not very busy there is a constant stream of cars.  What surprised us most was the sheer number of tourists!  For the first ten minutes we didn’t see a single local, only foreigners strolling the streets.  We couldn’t believe it!  We know that Laos has been on the tourist trail for quite some time, but it was honestly like visiting a holiday destination in Europe.  As a result, the streets are full of western-style restaurants, French bakeries and English signs everywhere.  We would have to search a bit harder to see the Laotian culture we were hoping for.  

Our first view of the 'scenic' Mekong River.  Surely things can only get better than this!

Our first view of the 'scenic' Mekong River.  Surely things can only get better than this!

Top Picks

Below is a list of things we did enjoy during our time in Vientiane.  If you are into temples then there are plenty to visit for free, and of course the plethora of cafes and restaurants to dine in.  If you have a bit of extra time and cash then there are lots of places to explore in the surrounding area such as caves, treks, river trips and more.  Here are our top picks:

 

Get A Bike

As far as capital cities go, Vientiane isn’t actually that big but if you want easy access to exploring what the city has to offer then cycling is the way to go.  With a bike you can visit all of the temples in one day: Wat Sisaket, Way Ho Phra Kaew and Wat Sokpaluang, and then onto the famous That Luang golden stupe.  You can cycle to some of the many markets: Talat Sao in the morning, followed by the Mekong riverside Night Market or the Ban Anou Night Food Market.  We would recommend stopping off in one or two of the many French-style cafes as you go, munching on a croissant or some freshly baked goods, and then continuing onto the Mekong River for a quick snap.  With a bike, it is also possible to cycle out of town to the Houey Hong Vocational Training Centre For Women where you can learn to weave and dye silks, or if you are feeling fit then head out 25km to the unique Buddha Park Xieng Khuan.  Bike rental is really cheap and hire for the day starts from 7000 kip (63p).

Bike rental

Bike rental

Visit The COPE Museum 

Unknown to us any many others, we discovered that Laos is the most bombed country in the entire world.  A shocking 270 million bombies were dropped on Laos during the Vietnam war between 1964 and 1973, and 30% of those bombs are still unexploded today.  That means that the people of Laos are still living under these horrific conditions of having unexploded bombs on their doorsteps. The bombs were dropped by the American army to stop the Vietcong's supply route through Laos. Although much international aid has been given to Laos it has not been enough to remove all the unexploded bombs. 

COPE is a charity which helps those who have suffered injury relating to a UXO/landmine, by providing those in need of prosthetics and rehabilitation.  They have set up a museum in Vientiane which explains what happened during the Vietnam war, how people have been affected, and what their role is of supporting victims in need.  We would strongly recommend a trip to this museum, it's pretty tough going but it's important to raise awareness of the terrible situation Laos has suffered and is still suffering.  Entry is free, but after seeing the horrors for yourself you will be hard pressed to leave without putting a few notes in the donations box.

 
Red marks the places affected by US bomb strikes on Laos during the Vietnam war

Red marks the places affected by US bomb strikes on Laos during the Vietnam war

 

Taste Lao Coffee

Walk down any street in Vientiane and you will see tiny stalls stacked high with cans of condensed milk.  Why you might ask?  Well this is the sign of local Laos coffee, served with this intensely thick and sweetened milk.  A cup of this stuff is almost like having a pudding, or a hot chocolate... rich and moorish. Laos coffee is of an incredibly high quality and is one of the countries main exports.  Local farmers can make a far more sustainable living selling coffee beans  than grains and vegetables which are of lower retail value.  Laos produces two main types of coffee, Arabica and Robusta, and the one that is featured in this punch packing cup is the latter.  So grab a coffee, take a seat and watch the tourists go past.  Expect to pay around 5000-7000 kip (45p-63p) for a cup.  This coffee is sold anywhere in Laos and not just Vientiane.

Laos coffee

Laos coffee

Haggle At The Talat Sao Morning Market

This cavernous mall goes back for miles and here you can find anything from a fridge freezer to a tailored Laotian pencil skirt.  This is a proper locals market, shabby round the edges and packed to the ceiling with goods for sale.  Here you can pick up clothes, antiques, jewellery, electricals, souvenirs, silk scarfs and much more.  Most things are reasonably priced although expect to haggle as much as you can.  A good starting point is dropping to a third of the original price and then going up from there. Don’t expect to pay more than two thirds of the original price.  The Laotian people are very friendly so remember to haggle with a smile on your face.  The market is open from 7am - 4pm daily and is based at Lane Xang Avenue at Khu Vieng Street.

Talat Sao Morning Market

Talat Sao Morning Market

Marvel At The That Luang Golden Stupe

The gleaming golden roof of Vientiane’s biggest stupe stands at 48 meters high and is Laos most important sacred monument.  It is also the countries national symbol, being featured on the official seal.  This is one very important Buddhist stupe you might say, so visiting is a must! Entry for a closer view is a mere 5000 kip (45p), and once inside you get to see the handiwork up close: hand carved stone dragons on the bannisters, ancient stone buddhas, and bucket loads of gold paint.  Buddhist tradition says to walk clockwise around the stupe three times, so you had better get walking!  Next to the stupe is also a number of other temples you can go inside for free, just remember to take your shoes off outside and dress appropriately (that means long skirts and cover exposed shoulders for women).  To get there you can cycle or jump in a tuk tuk.  Open Tuesday to Sunday, 08.00-12.00 and 13.00-16.00. 

That Luang Golden Stupe

That Luang Golden Stupe

Eat Your Body Weight In Croissants

Who doesn’t love a buttery warm croissant; crunchy on the outside with a deliciously soft centre.... mmm yum! Well you will be very happy to hear that Vientiane has a plethora of bakeries and French-style cafes, all stocked with fresh bread, cakes and more drinks than you could choose from.  Lao was part of the French colony until the 1940s which might explain why the quality of the baked goods is so high.  Croissants are a particular highlight and are as good as the ones you will find in any European store.  For those of you who have been on the road for a long time, this is a little taste of home.  So grab a drink, take a seat and munch on a croissant or two.  We would recommend eating at Le Banneton.  

Croissants in Le Banneton

Croissants in Le Banneton

Watch The Sunset Over The Mekong

By day the Mekong River is unassuming, a wide expanse of flowing water where locals fish, long boats pass and not very much happens.  It is a bit shabby round the edges, lined with crumbling paths and sadly there is a fair bit of rubbish kicking around the banks.  At around dusk the light begins to change, more colour comes into the hazy sky and the gleaming sun lowers over the glistening waters below.  A Mekong sunset is a special one, slow, magical and full of life.  The reeds gently sway in front of the reddening sun, the long boats silhouette against the moving waters.  Thankfully as it gets dark, you can’t see all the rubbish only the beautiful sunset that appears before you.  So grab a Lao beer, take a seat on the grubby steps and watch the sun dissolve into the landscape.

Sunset by the Mekong River

Sunset by the Mekong River

Visit The Bustling Evening Market

Every day at around 5pm, sellers prepare for a busy evening ahead of selling, selling and you guessed it, more selling.  Red roofed stalls pop up, lining the pathways of the Mekong River, and the locals stock their tables with all manor of goods.  The market is aimed at tourists, and there are definitely enough of them to fill the enormous strip.  Here you can pick yourself up anything from cheap chinese socks to hand woven Laotian textiles.  There are loads of trinkets and small items perfect for sending home as gifts.  Same rules apply with haggling, start at a third of the price and work up.  If you are in the market for a tasty snack then why not pick up a donner kebab bap for a bargain 10,000 kip (90p), it was actually really good!

The Evening Market by the Mekong River

The Evening Market by the Mekong River

Learn To Weave And Hand-Dye Silks

Cycle 7km northeast of Vientiane centre and you will find The Houey Hong Vocational Training Centre For Women where you can see locals busy at work creating traditional Laotian textiles.  The school teaches women of all ages and backgrounds how to weave, make designs for weaving, ikat (a resistance dying method) and dip dying techniques for silk.  So far they have trained up 650 women with the intention of giving them the skills to command a higher living wage.  They also run short classes for tourists where you can either learn to weave on one of their looms, or you can dye up a silk scarf using natural dyes such as marigold and onion peel.  We spent a happy 2 hours weaving, alternating lines of colour and Ali learnt how to weave a pattern by hand.  Once having a go for yourself, you will really appreciate the time and skill that goes into crafting textiles.  The centre also has a wonderful shop where they sell high quality hand-made goods that are produced on site.  The centre is open Monday to Saturday and is closed for an hour over lunch time.  Weaving for a couple of hours with lunch included cost us 130,000 kip (£11.50) each, which is really reasonable considering you learn a new skill and get to keep your textiles.

Learning to weave at the Houey Hong Vocational Training Centre For Women

Learning to weave at the Houey Hong Vocational Training Centre For Women

Highlight

For us the highlight of Vientiane was the weaving workshop.  Ali gets really excited going to new countries and looking at all of their textiles, and it’s such a big part of the Lao culture that it’s worth understanding how it’s made.  Many women still wear Sinh, a traditional wrapped pencil skirt made from patterned woven textiles, which is why weaving plays such a big role in their handicrafts.

 

Did We Dig It?

After spending almost 3 full days there, we sadly decided it wasn’t for us.  We were searching for something more authentic of the Lao way of life.  We wanted to learn about local culture, to see how people live their lives, what they cook and how they spend their days.  For us, sitting in a nice cafe full of tourists is fine for a short while, but it wasn't going to show us the real Lao.  You can clearly enjoy yourself here if you are happy to hang out in cafes, nice bars and restaurants, but if you want something more then we would say there are better places to visit.  Luang Prabang is a similar city set on the Mekong River and is a lot more scenic, although again don't expect it to be free of tourists.  Perhaps we would have to head to the countryside to get a glimpse of real-life Lao we were searching for.

 

What Do You Say?

3 days in Vientiane was enough for us, we would be really interested to hear your thoughts too. Did we miss something?  Was there anything you enjoyed doing there?  Next stop for us is Luang Namtha to do some jungle trekking in the Nam Ha National Park, and then onto Nong Khiaw and Muang Ngoi for the mountain scenery.  Fingers crossed we can find some beautiful landscapes and meet more locals!

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Laos - Top Things To Do In Vientiane, by Studio Mali
 

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Video: Huangshan Mountains

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Huangshan is home to one of China’s 5 sacred mountains, commonly known as the yellow mountains, or Huangshan. We camped and trekked in this park for 4 days, enjoying its incredible views, deciphering it’s confusing maps and witnessing some of the most bewildering sunsets we’ve ever seen. You can check them out in our video below:

Interested in visiting Huangshan?

Why not read through our blog post on getting there, camping and what life on the mountain is like.. 

 
 

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